Information aversion

What is that mental state in which you are averse to hearing ideas that you believe will change your way of thinking? Is it part of one's existing personality revolting against the threat of its extinction? Or a desire to live in intellectual comfort, lying on the couch of familiar, well-worn notions? Or is it simply being too attached to one's own ideas and beliefs? I have been led to such reflections by reading Nick Belkin's 1981 essay, Ineffable concepts in information retrieval, in which he talks of "anomalous states of knowledge -- the recognition by the user that her/his knowledge of a topic or situation of concern is inadequate". According to Belkin, such a state is the genesis of the user's information need, the instigator in turn of the search engine query. Is information aversion in part a desire to avoid the discomfort of anomalous states of knowledge?

Also, technical paper titles should more often start with the word "ineffable". Take, for instance, the rather dry sounding "Combining LVCSR and vocabulary-independent ranked utterance retrieval for robust speech search" from SIGIR 2009. Wouldn't you much rather read "Ineffable combinations of LVCSR and vocabulary-independent ranked utterance retrieval for robust speech search"?

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